The Tower

Sunday, Sep 20, 2020 – Pentecost XVI

Dear Friends,

Who would have thought that we would love to have the sun on us during outside worship, but we did need the warmth this morning.  We participated in the West Virginia Council of Church’s Day of Hope, welcoming Stephanie Stout as our guest speaker.  Stephanie’s powerful and moving testimony gave us all a deeper appreciation of addiction’s effects.  We will continue our efforts to make a difference in the lives of those who have been afflicted and their families.

We will continue our outside service at 9 AM next week and on October 4 (Blessing of the Animals).  On October 11 we will return to our 8 and 10 AM schedule in the church.  The Vestry will meet this week to finalize our indoor worship plan. 

Please remember in your prayers all of those who are sick, especially those who suffer from addiction and their families (especially the children), those who minister healing and hope to those who are sick, the frightened, our school children and their teachers and families, doing so with hearts of gratitude for all of God’s continual love and mercy in our lives. 

GT

The Lessons

Exodus 16:2-15

Philippians 1:21-30

Matthew 20:1-16

A Homily

For many years I kept a threefold piece of advice from a wise man on my desk: “Life is not fair.  You are not God.  Don’t be a jerk.”  It seems in many ways today that the parable in the Gospel is intricately intertwined with  that simple counsel.

Everything in most of us wants to respond like the workers who worked all day.  Not fair! All day versus one hour for the same pay is not right, not fair.  The truth is that in the economy of the world in which we live, it is not fair.

The key to the parable though is just that.  It is a parable.  Jesus tells that He is describing the Kingdom of God.  He is not giving us economic advice.  Rather, Jesus is describing a wonderful and glorious truth about what God is like in relationship with us humans.  He tells us that God is over abundantly generous, kind, loving, showering us with love and grace and mercy we have not and could never earn.  It is the truth that lies at the very heart of the Gospel of Christ.  God chooses to give what God chooses to give.  We, who put all kinds of conditions on our love and generosity, are not God.  Life in His Kingdom, our relationship with Him, is not about who earns what, not about the merits of good works.  It is about God’s love, mercy, kindness and from our all too human point of view, His generosity to a fault.  We cannot, do not get into the Kingdom, go to Heaven, be in relationship with God through our own action.  We are grafted into it, have His arms wrapped around us, dare approach Him at all because of Him—His love, mercy, generosity, and grace even unto death on a Cross.  

So, if that is the case, why work or try at all?  Why do anything?    Why bother to be kind or love at all ourselves?  If salvation, if our place in the Kingdom is assured, why work so hard (often against our very nature) to love, serve, or follow the ethical demands of Kingdom, Gospel life.  What is the motivation for the Christian life and Way?  Why not just be a jerk?

The answer to those questions is really two-fold.  First our instinctual and best response to love is to love in return.  God’s overwhelming, unconditional loving of us literally unto death calls forth in us our own response of love. The life of Christians is always motivated by our own love for God who first loves us.  The goal of every true lover is to please, to be in union and communion with the beloved. Paul talks about that wonderful relationship when he says that he counts everything as rubbish, just so much trash, in the face of knowing and loving Christ Jesus the Lord.  Love by its very nature begets more loving, love that overflows from the relationship between the two to enlighten and serve all around us.  So, we live in a manner worthy of the Gospel because we have the privilege of being loved by and loving Jesus. 

Secondly, and Paul puts in finger on this part this morning in Philippians, “living is Christ”.  To love and be loved, here, now is simply enough.  Knowing God in Jesus, having experienced even a piece of His overwhelming, unconditional love for me in this life is enough.  That is life in the Kingdom.  It is Heaven.  A live lived in love with Jesus is transformed into a joy and peace, a newness, into Real Life, Kingdom life.  To know the love, mercy, generosity, and kindness of God in Jesus is Life.  Again, Paul is right on.  Life or death, it’s OK.  Either way I am loved deeply, profoundly in a way that a gives more life than I could never have imagined.  So, how could I ever begrudge one who comes late to the party, who has missed so much of what I have been privileged to enjoy?

The wise man’s threefold piece of advice, simple as it is, could easily have sprung from this parable this morning.  Life is not fair.  No, life in the Kingdom, in God’s economy is much more than fair for God is always more generous, more loving, more kind and merciful, more good to us than we deserve or could imagine.

We are not God, but He longs for our response of love to the reality of His love and mercy and awesome generosity, a response of relationship that really is Life itself.

So, don’t be a jerk.  Live the life we are given by God.  Life that is Christ.  Life that is love.  Life that reflects the privilege of the love and grace and mercy and kindness and generosity of God with which we are showered. 

AMEN

Some Prayers

Grant us, Lord, not to be anxious about earthly things, but to
love things heavenly; and even now, while we are placed among
things that are passing away, to hold fast to those that shall
endure; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns
with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Almighty God, you have created each person with many and varied

gifts and joined our lives together as members of the Episcopal

Diocese of West Virginia.  Look graciously upon us as we search for

our eighth Bishop, that we may receive a faithful pastor, who will care

for your people and equip us for our ministries.  Give us minds to discern

your will, courage to follow where you lead, and hearts to love as you command,

to the glory of your Son, our Savior, Jesus Christ.  Amen

Christ we rise today
Knowing that you alone
Know our hearts
You alone can change
Our sadness into joy
Forgive us our shortcomings
Teach us patience
Teach us kindness
Help us to forgive
Those who have injured us
And keep us from injuring others
Keep our way lighted
With your steadfast love

Amen.

O God, you made us in your own image and redeemed us
through Jesus your Son: Look with compassion on the whole
human family; take away the arrogance and hatred which
infect our hearts; break down the walls that separate us;
unite us in bonds of love; and work through our struggle and
confusion to accomplish your purposes on earth; that, in
your good time, all nations and races may serve you in
harmony around your heavenly throne; through Jesus Christ
our Lord. Amen.

O God, you have bound us together in a common life. Help us,
in the midst of our struggles for justice and truth, to confront
one another without hatred or bitterness, and to work
together with mutual forbearance and respect; through Jesus
Christ our Lord. Amen.

O heavenly Father, who hast filled the world with beauty:
Open our eyes to behold thy gracious hand in all thy works;
that, rejoicing in thy whole creation, we may learn to serve
thee with gladness; for the sake of him through whom all
things were made, thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

O God of peace, who hast taught us that in returning and
rest we shall be saved, in quietness and confidence shall be
our strength: By the might of thy Spirit lift us, we pray thee,
to thy presence, where we may be still and know that thou
art
 God; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

This is another day, O Lord.  I know not what it will bring

forth, but make me ready, Lord, for whatever it may be.  If I

am to stand up, help me to stand bravely.  If I am to sit still,

help me to sit quietly.  If I am to lie low, help me to do it

patiently.  And if I am to do nothing, let me do it gallantly. 

Make these words more than words, and give me the Spirit

of Jesus.  Amen.

O God, whose fatherly care reacheth to the uttermost parts
of the earth: We humbly beseech thee graciously to behold
and bless those whom we love, now absent from us. Defend
them from all dangers of soul and body; and grant that both
they and we, drawing nearer to thee, may be bound together
by thy love in the communion of thy Holy Spirit, and in the
fellowship of thy saints; through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Keep watch, dear Lord, with those who work, or watch, or
weep, and give your angels charge over those who
sleep. Tend the sick, Lord Christ; give rest to the weary, bless
the dying, soothe the suffering, pity the afflicted, shield the
joyous; and all for your love’s sake. Amen.

Almighty God, Father of all mercies,
we your unworthy servants give you humble thanks
for all your goodness and loving-kindness
to us and to all whom you have made.
We bless you for our creation, preservation,
and all the blessings of this life;
but above all for your immeasurable love
in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ;
for the means of grace, and for the hope of glory.
And, we pray, give us such an awareness of your mercies,
that with truly thankful hearts we may show forth your praise,
not only with our lips, but in our lives,
by giving up our selves to your service,
and by walking before you
in holiness and righteousness all our days;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
to whom, with you and the Holy Spirit,
be honor and glory throughout all ages. Amen.

And now unto God’s gracious mercy and protection we commit you.

May the Lord bless you and keep you.

May the Lord lift up the light of His countenance upon you and give you His peace this day and forever more. 

Amen. 

TRINITY CHURCH NEWS, Thursday, September 17, 2020

Please join us for special worship on Sunday, September 20th at 9:00 am in the church yard. We will welcome Guest Speaker, Stephanie Stout, who serves as the Recovery Services Coordinator at the Berkeley County Recovery Resource Center. She has multiple connections within the Eastern Panhandle to help serve the recovery community and those seeking help for a substance use disorder. She has been highly involved with creating new outreach programs throughout Berkeley County. She collaborates with multiple local and statewide treatment facilities and health providers to help individuals find quality care. 

Here is a link with more information about the service and ways you can help:   https://wvcc.org/day-of-hope/

Please wear a mask and bring your own chairs. You do not need to RSVP at this time.

We hope you can attend 😊 This service is also LIVE on our Facebook page each Sunday so you can join us that way too.

Survey to Select a New Bishop: Don’t miss this opportunity for your thoughts and concerns to be included in our search for a Bishop Coadjutor who will eventually become Diocesan Bishop upon Bishop Klusmeyer’s retirement.  Below are links for a survey from the Coadjutor Search Committee.  The first link leads directly to the online survey; the second link is the same survey for those who prefer using a PDF format.

The survey is open until Sunday, October 4.  Please give us your feedback! Thank you.

The online survey is here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/EDWV The PDF survey is here: Landscape for the Episcopal Diocese of West Virginia 

The Thrift Shop will now be accepting donations on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and SUNDAYS. They are open for shopping on Fridays from 10-4 and Saturdays 10-1.

Ushers Needed: as Trinity looks to transition worship back into the church this fall, we will need ushers to welcome and dismiss the congregation based on new safety guidelines.

Please reply to this email or talk to GT if you can help. Thank you!

Please join us for Morning Prayer each day at 8:00am on the porch.

We also offer an Evening Prayer Service over Zoom on Wednesdays. An invitation is sent to everyone on email. Let us know if you need it.

Update from Shepherdstown Shares: We need two things from you, PLEASE.  We need you to VOLUNTEER and we need you to DONATE! We are on the fast track in developing our Food Pantry, so we need people to help us out in a variety of ways—organizing, packing bags, distributing food bags at Trinity Chapel, etc. Send an email to ShepShares@gmail.com to express your interest and we will give you a call! Our second request of you is that we need you to DONATE.  The needs are increasing, and we need to constantly keep an eye on our bottom line.  You can donate through PayPal (search for Shepherdstown Shares) or drop a check off at JSB. For more information, refer to our website, shepherdstownshares.org. 

Shepherdstown Shares Share Your Change initiative will continue each Sunday during the Farmers Market hours for the Fall season.  Thanks to our community’s generosity we have already collected close to $1300 to feed those who are experiencing food insecurity during COVID-19. Our table is located next to the library.  As always, you can donate during the week by bringing your change to JSB and ask that it be deposited in the Shepherdstown Shares account. 

The Bench Project is an ongoing success!  We hope you will stroll down German Street to see four beautifully painted handcrafted benches. Try them out! We can assure you they are comfortable and sturdy as well as beautiful! If you would like to sponsor a bench, please contact Marianne Davis at shepshares@gmail.com  Your sponsorship employs craftsmen and artists make ends meet during these  tough economic times. Your generosity also supports our restaurants by providing extra seating for their patrons while seating capacity is reduced.  The Bench Project also provides public art for all to enjoy outdoors.  The weekend of September 19-20 will be the last opportunity to watch an artist in action at Trinity Churchyard, corner of Church and German Streets. Stop by from 10-4 pm (weather permitting) and chat with the artists as they create their interpretation of “The Spirit of Shepherdstown”. 

Now is the time for Fall garden and yard cleanup so contact shepshares@gmail.com to participate in our Work4Workers program. If you need no-contact outdoor work done, we have those who are willing to work! Please go to our website shepherdstownshares.org and check it out. There is a simple form to complete and ShepShares board member Annie Wisecarver will contact you.

If you know if someone in need in our 25443-zip code area, please let us know or encourage them to contact us. We will do our best to help. We continue to spread support and love in our community as the virus spreads.

FREE FURNITURE: a member of our congregation has a twin bed frame and matching dresser from Ethan Allen in white maple and several occasional side tables she would like to re-home. Please reply to this email if you are interested.

Jennifer Perrotte
Parish Secretary
304-876-6990

Wednesday, Sep 16, 2020 – Zoom Evening Prayer

Dear Friends,

Trinity Church is inviting you to a 7:00 pm Zoom Evening Prayer meeting on Wednesday, September 16.   Log in begins at 6:45 pm.  Follow the link below. 

The Service is Daily Evening Prayer, Rite Two, found on Page 115 of the Book of Common Prayer.  Please contact the office if you need a Prayer Book. 

We welcome participants to read a section of the service.  Possible sections are: The Psalm and/or Readings appointed for the day, The Song of Mary, The Song of Simeon, The Apostles Creed and/or The General Thanksgiving.

The Readings appointed for this Wednesday evening are: 119:73-96, BCP Page 769; Job 42:1-17; and John 12:20-26.    

There will be time after Evening Prayer to chat & catch up with friends.   We hope you will join us!

—————————————

Trinity Church is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Trinity Church’s Evening Prayer Zoom Meeting
Time: Sep 16, 2020 06:45 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/98892298088?pwd=UFRma0I5WUE0YUlBR25WUitxcDJBdz09

Meeting ID: 988 9229 8088
Passcode: 822539

Sunday, September 13, 2020 – Pentecost XV

Dear Friends,

Who would have believed when we started outside?  Another beautiful morning.   It has been a hard week for many—starting back to school with all the new protocols in place, increases in Covid case, especially west of us in West Virginia, the ongoing political nastiness, a remembrance of September 11, 2001.    It behooves us I think to find ways to be grateful.  Of course, we keep always in our prayers the sick, the frightened, those who care for all of us, especially the first responders. We remember, too, all of those affected by the terrible wildfires out west.   Prayers do make a difference.  So does gratitude.  Being thankful for all we have and have been given especially in the midst of toil and trouble lifts our sights to see the presence of Jesus here with us, loving us, walking with us, binding us up, making us new and alive again.  Never miss an opportunity to be thankful.  It will make all the difference.  

The Lessons:

Exodus 14:18-31

Romans 14:1-12

Matthew 18:21-35

A Homily

The Gospel this morning  describes a fundamental action given to and required of us Christians—forgiveness.  It is perhaps one of the hardest and most important of all spiritual disciplines: the art and grace of forgiveness.

Last week’s gospel made clear that vengeance, recompense belong to God.  This week Jesus calls us up yet higher.  Not only are we not to seek vengeance, we are called to forgive.  That is certainly not news to us.  We say it each time we pray the Lord’s Prayer, “Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us”.

How hard the art and grace of forgiveness is.  I’m not sure we are ever particularly good at it.  Pray for our enemies?  Why, it is hard enough to forgive (fill in the blanks).  The girl in seventh grade who stole the boy you loved?  The woman who married your grandfather and took all the family heirlooms?  Your spouse for last night?  Your child?  God?

Life, particularly Gospel life and Kingdom Life demands and insists on relationships marked by love, which by their very nature, necessitate trust and vulnerability and that very fact means that we will be hurt.  Somewhere, sometime, somehow, our vulnerability will cause us pain and our trust will be betrayed.  More than how we handle the love and the trust, the way in which we handle the betrayal and pain will color and mark the quality and character of our lives.  If we respond only with anger, pain, retreat, we can be certain we will live there.  If, instead, we learn the art and grace of forgiveness, we will move on to love again and yet more life.  It has been observed that we are called to forgive others not because they deserve forgiveness but because we deserve life and peace. 

Please note that Jesus sets the example for us.  He put His money where His mouth is this morning.  From His Cross one of his last words was, “Father, forgive them.”  Notice that he did not forgive them because Pilate, the Roman soldiers, the crowds, the Jewish hierarchy, and His disciples who abandoned Him repented of their behaviors.  The uncalculating, unlimited forgiveness that flowed from the Cross of Calvary came forth not because of Jesus’ executioners, who they were, what they did, but because of who Jesus was and is. 

And therein lies the first lesson of the art and grace of forgiveness.  It is always more about me (the forgiver) than it is about the offender.  Forgiveness frees us from that to which we are all too tempted to cling, an old injury.  Forgiveness free up a place in the heart better used for another purpose: love and the life it brings.  As such, forgiveness in not really about the past.  It is not opening and reopening the case against the offender.  Thus, there is a kind of “holy forgetfulness”.  We may never forget what happened, but we may well find that we have forgotten the awful feeling of betrayal and offense that accompanied the action.  Forgiveness allows us to close the case and move on, walking freely into the future instead of endlessly circling the past about which we can do nothing but feed more anger, betrayal, and pain. 

But, what about the offender?  First of all, forgiveness is not acquittal.  It doesn’t mean that the other person was innocent.  If that were true, forgiveness would not be necessary.  It doesn’t say, “It’s OK”.  Things OK don’t need to be forgiven.  Secondly, forgiveness does not mean that there are no consequences for the offense.  God and others may well forgive one convicted of a criminal action, but that does not nullify the prison sentence that must be served.   A relationship may be so terribly damaged that it cannot be restored or if restored may never be the same or to be really restored may take a long time of healing.   As our marriage service makes clear, “forgiveness heals guilt”, but healing is seldom immediate in physical terms and is almost never so in relationship terms.  Forgiveness does not seek to excuse the reality of what happened.  It does seek to heal, to restore if possible, and to enable everyone to become whole, well, and alive and in love again without the need to carry the hurt, betrayal, and pain of the past. 

Finally, forgiveness is a theological and spiritual issue and decision, sometimes even a discipline.  It is not necessarily a feeling or emotional determination.  I don’t know about you, but if I have to wait for a rush of warm, fuzzy feelings about someone who has hurt me deeply in order to forgive, we’d be waiting an awfully long time.  The way we feel about someone, about the situation may well lag well behind our spiritual, theological decision to forgive.  Often the feelings come later.  However, the decision to forgive can be made despite how I feel.  It really amounts (and this is why I refer to forgiveness a grace) to making a decision to take something way too hard for me to do or handle on my own and hand it over to God who can handle it.  I can decide not to seek vengeance, not to wish ill or harm, not to hate and fear (thus Jesus’ injunction to “pray for our enemies”.  That one often does us more good than them, I think.) Once I have given my need to forgive to God, have asked for the grace of forgiveness, and I may need to do it again and again for a while.  (Most disciplines require practice.) I can say I have forgiven and wait in patience and hope for God to complete more and more of the healing of my heart and ego, freeing me of the pain and anger that has gripped me.  Finally, that new place in the heart for love and life will open. 

How often are we to forgive?  Seventy time seven, infinitely, says Jesus.  Infinitely because we are called to live in the vulnerability of lives of love, the love that has been poured into our hearts.  That loving means that we will suffer hurt and betrayal of trust.  Life, real life, is found only in the risk and wonder of love, the very power and presence of God Himself.  And those who love get hurt (witness the life of Jesus) and that means that we like Jesus before us need to learn well and practice the fine art, grace and discipline of forgiveness.  For in it is found healing and love and life.  Without it we, like the man in the Gospel story this morning will find ourselves in the prison and torture of all the hurts of the past. 

AMEN

Some Prayers

O God, because without you we are not able to please you,
mercifully grant that your Holy Spirit may in all things direct
and rule our hearts; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives
and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and
for ever. Amen.

Almighty God, you have created each person with many and varied

gifts and joined our lives together as members of the Episcopal

Diocese of West Virginia.  Look graciously upon us as we search for

our eighth Bishop, that we may receive a faithful pastor, who will care

for your people and equip us for our ministries.  Give us minds to discern

your will, courage to follow where you lead, and hearts to love as you command,

to the glory of your Son, our Savior, Jesus Christ.  Amen

Christ we rise today
Knowing that you alone
Know our hearts
You alone can change
Our sadness into joy
Forgive us our shortcomings
Teach us patience
Teach us kindness
Help us to forgive
Those who have injured us
And keep us from injuring others
Keep our way lighted
With your steadfast love

Amen.

O God, you made us in your own image and redeemed us
through Jesus your Son: Look with compassion on the whole
human family; take away the arrogance and hatred which
infect our hearts; break down the walls that separate us;
unite us in bonds of love; and work through our struggle and
confusion to accomplish your purposes on earth; that, in
your good time, all nations and races may serve you in
harmony around your heavenly throne; through Jesus Christ
our Lord. Amen.

O God, you have bound us together in a common life. Help us,
in the midst of our struggles for justice and truth, to confront
one another without hatred or bitterness, and to work
together with mutual forbearance and respect; through Jesus
Christ our Lord. Amen.

O heavenly Father, who hast filled the world with beauty:
Open our eyes to behold thy gracious hand in all thy works;
that, rejoicing in thy whole creation, we may learn to serve
thee with gladness; for the sake of him through whom all
things were made, thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

O God of peace, who hast taught us that in returning and
rest we shall be saved, in quietness and confidence shall be
our strength: By the might of thy Spirit lift us, we pray thee,
to thy presence, where we may be still and know that thou
art
 God; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

This is another day, O Lord.  I know not what it will bring

forth, but make me ready, Lord, for whatever it may be.  If I

am to stand up, help me to stand bravely.  If I am to sit still,

help me to sit quietly.  If I am to lie low, help me to do it

patiently.  And if I am to do nothing, let me do it gallantly. 

Make these words more than words, and give me the Spirit

of Jesus.  Amen.

O God, whose fatherly care reacheth to the uttermost parts
of the earth: We humbly beseech thee graciously to behold
and bless those whom we love, now absent from us. Defend
them from all dangers of soul and body; and grant that both
they and we, drawing nearer to thee, may be bound together
by thy love in the communion of thy Holy Spirit, and in the
fellowship of thy saints; through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Keep watch, dear Lord, with those who work, or watch, or
weep, and give your angels charge over those who
sleep. Tend the sick, Lord Christ; give rest to the weary, bless
the dying, soothe the suffering, pity the afflicted, shield the
joyous; and all for your love’s sake. Amen.

Almighty God, Father of all mercies,
we your unworthy servants give you humble thanks
for all your goodness and loving-kindness
to us and to all whom you have made.
We bless you for our creation, preservation,
and all the blessings of this life;
but above all for your immeasurable love
in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ;
for the means of grace, and for the hope of glory.
And, we pray, give us such an awareness of your mercies,
that with truly thankful hearts we may show forth your praise,
not only with our lips, but in our lives,
by giving up our selves to your service,
and by walking before you
in holiness and righteousness all our days;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
to whom, with you and the Holy Spirit,
be honor and glory throughout all ages. Amen.

And now unto God’s gracious mercy and protection we commit you.

May the Lord bless you and keep you.

May the Lord lift up the light of His countenance upon you and give you His peace this day and forever more. 

Amen. 

TRINITY CHURCH NEWS – Thursday, September 10, 2020

Survey to Select a New Bishop: Don’t miss this opportunity for your thoughts and concerns to be included in our search for a Bishop Coadjutor who will eventually become Diocesan Bishop upon Bishop Klusmeyer’s retirement.  Below are links for a survey from the Coadjutor Search Committee.  The first link leads directly to the online survey; the second link is the same survey for those who prefer using a PDF format.

The survey is open until Sunday, October 4.  Please give us your feedback! Thank you.

The online survey is here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/EDWV The PDF survey is here: Landscape for the Episcopal Diocese of West Virginia 

The THRIFT SHOP will be accepting donations on Thursdays – Sundays only. They are open for shopping on Fridays from 10-4 and Saturdays 10-1.

Ushers Needed: as Trinity looks to transition worship back into the church this fall, we will need ushers to welcome and dismiss the congregation based on new safety guidelines. Please reply to this email or talk to GT if you can help. Thank you!

Please join us for worship on Sunday, September 6th at 9:00 am in the church yard. Please wear a mask and bring your own chairs. You do not need to RSVP at this time. We hope you can attend 😊 This service is also LIVE on our Facebook page each Sunday so you can join us that way too.

Outdoor worship will continue through October 4th and we will hold our annual Blessing of the Animals service on 10/4.

We will also have a Opioid Awareness Sunday on September 20th to include a guest speaker.

Please join us for Morning Prayer each day at 8:00am on the porch.

We also offer an Evening Prayer Service over Zoom on Wednesdays. An invitation is sent to everyone on email. Let us know if you need it.

Don’t Forget! We are selling grocery cards to Food Lion, Martins, Sheetz and Home Depot. You may purchase these after worship or call the office for a time to stop by.
A portion of these sales benefits Trinity and you receive the entire amount.

Jennifer Perrotte
Parish Secretary
304-876-6990